CONFERENCE THEME

GREEN CITIES FOR PEOPLE

16th of November, 2017

08:30 – 09:00

REGISTRATION

09:00 – 09:15

CONFERENCE OPENING AND WELCOME

Arvydas Avulis, President and Chairman of the Borad of Lithuanian Green Building Council

Rėda Brandišauskienė, Vice-minister of Environment of Republic of Lithuania

09:15 – 10:00

THE FUTURE OF SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT

Jerry Yudelson

Author/Keynote Speaker/Sustainability Consultant, USA

 

Summary

Sustainable Development is the watchword for this decade, enshrined in the UN’s the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development as Sustainable Development Goals. What are the large-scale trends influencing our ability to achieve these goals? In this presentation, I’ll be discussing Megatrends – large-scale trends pushing sustainable urban development forward and how you can use them to your advantage.

We’ll look at the challenges facing urban planning for sustainable development: moving beyond outmoded 20th-century approaches to a more resilient approach to land use, energy, transportation, water and waste management; and embracing the need to begin creating a circular economy, based on the concepts of recycling, renewable energy and ecology.

We’ll also look at technology trends that are making sustainable urbanism possible – how everything is getting “smaller, faster, lighter, denser, and cheaper,” and in the process opening up new avenues for innovation in urban sustainability. Beyond technology trends, we’ll profile related financial and social innovations providing new opportunities for businesses, large and small, and for government policy.

Finally, we’ll offer five specific action steps that government, NGOs and businesses, large and small, can take in the next three years to help create a more sustainable future. Whether you’re in business or government, design or engineering, academia or NGOs, you’ll find something you can take away to jump-start your efforts to create “Green Cities for People.”

10:00 – 10:30

GREEN BUILDINGS – SUSTAINABILITY CHALLENGE 

Mindaugas Kulbokas

Head of Research and Analysis in the Baltics, Newsec, Lithuania

Summary

First of all, it is an unnoticeable and invisible builder’s approach to changing consumer habits. Often, when seen from a short-term perspective, this can be regarded as an irrational investment or even as a divestment without a clearly defined payback period; in the long-run, though, it is a guarantee of commercial viability. Moreover, it is a fact that in today’s real estate lease market a square meter alone is no longer the single object leased, but it is rather a service that will be provided in those rented square meters. Indeed, it is not readily measurable in business terms, but obviously it is a guarantee of a long-term relationship between the lessor and the lessee. Expect to learn about this and more in the presentation. Let’s meet!

10:30 – 11:00

COFFEE BREAK/PRESS CONFERENCE

11:00 – 11:30

LEED AND BUILDING ENERGY MODELING SOLUTION 

Dr. Jaeyoon Koh

Senior applications engineer, LG Electronics, USA

Summary

LEED and Building Energy Modeling Solution

Since 1994, LEED has evolved from a green building standard to a comprehensive standard system from design and construction to building maintenance and operation. Many US federal agencies and state and local governments require LEED certification and, LEED is now popular in the US building sector.  Because energy conservation contributes the most to LEED’s score, a variety of high-efficiency building systems are applied to buildings. Using energy and cost-effective HVAC systems in energy modeling, architects, engineers, and owners can make better decisions about the long-term building lifecycle and increase LEED credit scores. This presentation will deliver energy modeling requirements in LEED certification, cost-effective building energy system design information, and energy simulation examples can help you to evaluate energy and cost savings future.

11:30 – 12:00

BIM ANALYSIS & PERFORMANCE: FROM BUILDINGS TO CITIES

Niall Gibson

Business Development Manager, Integrated Environmental Solutions, UK

 

Summary

BIM Analysis & Performance: From Buildings to Cities

Increasingly the true value of BIM is becoming clearer to the industry, in that the ultimate outcome is not 3D CAD and coordinated services design, it’s the creation, capture, analysis and sharing of information throughout design, construction and operation of an asset.

At the recent BRE/BuildingSMART BIM prospects event in London, AECOMs David Philp – a leading light in the implementation of the UK Governments BIM strategy, and member of the EU BIM Task Group, suggested that the Soft Landings framework coupled with the Government BIM strategy is a ‘golden thread’ linking data created during design with the operational phase of buildings. In order to better manage buildings with a view to reducing cost and carbon, we need to better understand their design intent and how they are being operated in reality. It is estimated that 80% of cost lies beyond the construction team involvement.

Historically it’s been challenging to validate how buildings perform in real-terms, and to compare that with the expectation that may exist at the design stage. A very simple example of this is when we compare buildings Energy Performance Certificate (EPC) against its energy bills and Display Energy Certificate (DEC). This has resulted in what many refer to as a Performance Gap. We will discuss the performance gap, where it comes from and how a BIM enabled process can help to close the gap.

Model Level of Detail (LOD) appropriate to the design stage is critical. The technology for this has been around for some time now and is continually evolving. Technology on its own does not provide a BIM solution. Process and the mind-set of people involved in the process needs to change in order to fully exploit a BIM enabled workflow. This is starting to happen more and more as the industry moves along the adoption curve.

This paper will aim to demonstrate how those that have a good understanding of the BIM process are having more success with BIM technology and Interoperability.

12:00 – 12:30

CITYLAB

Ann-Kristin Belkert

Citylab director, Sweden Green Building Council, Sweden

Summary

Citylab

Citylab is a forum for shared knowledge in the field of sustainable urban development for individuals and various types of urban development projects. Urban development projects receive help with going from vision to action and have the opportunity to certify their sustainability work. Citylab provides organisational and personal development as well as networking for people working with sustainable urban development. Citylab is oriented towards a sharing culture and joint learning process in collaboration between public and private entities, the civil society and academia. Citylab participants also gain access to exchanges with research and development projects. Citylab is made up of three interacting components: Citylab Action, Citylab Learning and Citylab Network.

12:30 – 13:30

LUNCH

13:30 – 14:00

CREATING VALUE FOR GREEN CITIES AND BUILDINGS – DANISH ARCHITECTS’ EXPERIENCES

Peter Andreas Sattrup

Architect and senior advisor on sustainability, Denmark

Summary

Creating value for green cities and buildings – Danish architects’ experiences

How does green urban and building design create value? Denmark and its capital Copenhagen is consistently ranked among the most livable places on earth. There may be many reasons behind that status, but a strong connection between design, planning, politics and business focused on the quality of the built environments is certainly among the key factors. Peter Andreas Sattrup shares insights into how Copenhagen was transformed from an industrial port city to a livable green city and discusses how architectural design and architects’ activism plays a defining role in creating shared value for societies.

14:00 – 14:30

SUSTAINABILITY BETWEEN BUILDINGS – PLANNING THE CITY OF MALMÖ 

Džiugas Lukoševičius

Architect, Malmo city planning Office,  Sweden

 

Summary

Sustainability between buildings – planning the city of Malmö

In recent decades Malmö went through a drastic shift from an industrial to a knowledge city. This required strong political will, close collaboration across institutions and innovative thinking. A clear vision, an action plan and series of pilot projects were developed and set to action to test new frontiers and possibilities. Probably the best known pilot project is the conversion of city’s industrial Western Harbor in early 2000. With its focus on ecological sustainability and attractive living environment it contributed to shifting city’s image and setting Malmö on world’s map.

What has the city learned from these pitot projects and how does planning work now, on a day-to-day basis? What challenges are we still facing? How are sustainability questions incorporated in all planning levels – from urban policies to detail planning? These are the questions discussed in presentation.

14:30 – 15:00

VILNIUS CITY MASTER PLAN RENEWED – IS THE CITY GETTING GREENER?

Mindaugas Pakalnis

Vilnius city chief architect, Lithuania

 

Summary

The key objective of amending Vilnius City master plan is to facilitate continuous, socially and economically-driven growth in the quality of life by means of developing multi-centred urban structure, maintaining internal developments of the inner city, encouraging multi-functional land use for the purpose of social integration and bridging the differences in development, involving the society into urban planning processes. It is intended to supplement the master plan with long-term criteria and indicators for sustainable urban development.

What could encourage constructing healthy, comfortable, durable, economic, energy-efficient buildings in Vilnius which could make a rational use of renewables throughout the entire life cycle of a building? What would be the impact of certification of buildings within a long-term perspective on the quality of life and work of people, on the background environment and development of innovations in the sector of real estate development?

15:00 – 15:15

AWARDING OF WINNERS OF COMPETITION „GREENEST BUILDING IN LITHUANIA 2017“

 

15:15 – 15:45

COFFEE BREAK

15:45 – 16:15

DOES SUSTAINABILITY PAY-OFF? (SALTONIŠKIŲ ST. 7 BUSINESS DISTRICT CASE STUDY, DISCUSSION)

Natalija Monkevičienė

CEO, M.M.M. Projektai, Lithuania

Summary

New business park (Saltoniškių g. 7) at a former bakery complex in Vilnius is being developed under  sustainable design principles.  This green district will be presented as a case trying to calculate the investment and the value of sustainability.

16:15 – 16:45

HOW TO MAKE AN EXISTING BUILDING GREEN? (PREMIUM BUSINESS CENTER CASE STUDY, DISCUSSION)

Jurij Novickij

CEO, Evolis, Lithuania

Summary

In the last decade, the importance of green environmentally friendly construction increased significantly. Up to 40 % of human civilization energy consumption and further CO2 emissions belong for buildings, therefore there is no doubt that buildings should be green. However, the main question is how to make buildings and their exploitation really green.

Flagship of the company – PREMIUM Business Centre, which embodies EVOLIS values: innovative, environmental-friendly and energy-efficient technologies. PREMIUM is not only an A-class office building, but also an A-class energy efficient buildings complex with a well-developed infrastructure, which in 2017 has become the first BREEAM In-Use Outstanding Building in the Baltic States.

In the presentation, the motivation and main features of a green building concept will be described. The evaluation and building certification criteria, the strategy to achieve high scores will be presented. The case of PREMIUM Business Centre to make existing building green and environmental friendly will be studied in details. Real examples of good practice, facts, required investments and modern building exploitation costs will be provided.

16:45 – 17:15

PANEL DISCUSSION

Participating: all conference speakers

Moderator: Martynas Babilas, Head of Corporate Solutions Baltics at Newsec, Lithuania

17:15

CLOSING OF THE CONFERENCE

17:15 -19:00

Wine reception 

Copyright © 2017. LGBC | Website created by KP

Conference enquiries: info@lzpt.lt